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Windows Dev enviroments - what do you use?

I've been using WAMP but I've found it to be very limiting in regards to getting everything set up how I like it because the manager thing messes with the conf files all the time. I like to have a VirtualDocumentRoot directive set up so that I can access .mydevserver.net and it will serve up whatever is in the www/ dir. I've just re-installed windows and wamp is now being a pain. Are there any better stacks out there? should I just create a virtual machine to do the job?

about 4 years ago, by wsg

17 Replies

katsu

I don't develop on windows anymore, but I used XAMPP quite a long time ago: http://www.apachefriends.org/en/xampp.html

katsu, about 4 years ago

pineapple
posted by katsu on Sun, Oct 14 at 03:25AM

I don't develop on windows anymore, but I used XAMPP quite a long time ago: http://www.apachefriends.org/en/xampp.html

I second that (from the few times I've had to). Thankfully I don't have to use Windows though.. I tried gvim once and wanted to kill myself.

pineapple, about 4 years ago

wsg
posted by pineapple on Sun, Oct 14 at 03:30AM
posted by katsu on Sun, Oct 14 at 03:25AM

I don't develop on windows anymore, but I used XAMPP quite a long time ago: http://www.apachefriends.org/en/xampp.html

I second that (from the few times I've had to). Thankfully I don't have to use Windows though.. I tried gvim once and wanted to kill myself.

I really wish I could get a mac but I just can't afford that kind of money. I would use linux but.. photoshop!

wsg, about 4 years ago

pineapple

pineapple, about 4 years ago

lush
posted by wsg on Sun, Oct 14 at 05:17AM
posted by pineapple on Sun, Oct 14 at 03:30AM
posted by katsu on Sun, Oct 14 at 03:25AM

I don't develop on windows anymore, but I used XAMPP quite a long time ago: http://www.apachefriends.org/en/xampp.html

I second that (from the few times I've had to). Thankfully I don't have to use Windows though.. I tried gvim once and wanted to kill myself.

I really wish I could get a mac but I just can't afford that kind of money. I would use linux but.. photoshop!

Or maybe a Hackintosh? There's a few ready to go rigs for sale on ebay.

lush, about 4 years ago

pineapple

Hackintosh is probably another really great option. I only tried to do that once and I swore I would never do it again. Granted, it was on a shitty laptop and not a qualified pre-built box, but you could say I certainly learned about kexts, heh

pineapple, about 4 years ago

lush
posted by pineapple on Sun, Oct 14 at 04:51PM

Hackintosh is probably another really great option. I only tried to do that once and I swore I would never do it again. Granted, it was on a shitty laptop and not a qualified pre-built box, but you could say I certainly learned about kexts, heh

Yeah you would need to use matching hardware, specifically for audio and wifi etc. Still, nothing beats a genuine Mac, also if you value your craft you should definitely invest.

lush, about 4 years ago

pineapple
posted by lush on Sun, Oct 14 at 05:08PM
posted by pineapple on Sun, Oct 14 at 04:51PM

Hackintosh is probably another really great option. I only tried to do that once and I swore I would never do it again. Granted, it was on a shitty laptop and not a qualified pre-built box, but you could say I certainly learned about kexts, heh

Yeah you would need to use matching hardware, specifically for audio and wifi etc. Still, nothing beats a genuine Mac, also if you value your craft you should definitely invest.

Your last part I wholeheartedly agree with. $3k is a lot for a computer I suppose, but when you make that in a few days programming/designing websites it absolutely makes sense as an investment. I also couldn't live without my 27" cinema display, it is my baby. Just get one good gig for a small business and your computer is already paid off. Oh yes... also a year later the power converter in my monitor failed and apple fixes it for free in a few hours, their support is superb.

I've only upgraded my laptop once, but I know my old laptop is running strong because it sold it to someone I know. So technically, in the life of that ONE macbook pro, I know someone else who has gone through several shitty Acer and HP PC laptops. They just straight up die, overheat, explode, catch fire, whatever. My girlfriends mac laptop is so old that is literally warping from over-use, and it's also still going strong years and years later.

pineapple, about 4 years ago

wsg

I think you guys have convinced me that I'm just going to have to bite the bullet and get myself a mac - I'd probably have to save up as I'm not hugely successful at the moment haha!

wsg, about 4 years ago

lush
posted by pineapple on Sun, Oct 14 at 05:13PM
posted by lush on Sun, Oct 14 at 05:08PM
posted by pineapple on Sun, Oct 14 at 04:51PM

Hackintosh is probably another really great option. I only tried to do that once and I swore I would never do it again. Granted, it was on a shitty laptop and not a qualified pre-built box, but you could say I certainly learned about kexts, heh

Yeah you would need to use matching hardware, specifically for audio and wifi etc. Still, nothing beats a genuine Mac, also if you value your craft you should definitely invest.

Your last part I wholeheartedly agree with. $3k is a lot for a computer I suppose, but when you make that in a few days programming/designing websites it absolutely makes sense as an investment. I also couldn't live without my 27" cinema display, it is my baby. Just get one good gig for a small business and your computer is already paid off. Oh yes... also a year later the power converter in my monitor failed and apple fixes it for free in a few hours, their support is superb.

I've only upgraded my laptop once, but I know my old laptop is running strong because it sold it to someone I know. So technically, in the life of that ONE macbook pro, I know someone else who has gone through several shitty Acer and HP PC laptops. They just straight up die, overheat, explode, catch fire, whatever. My girlfriends mac laptop is so old that is literally warping from over-use, and it's also still going strong years and years later.

Yeah 27" iMac here, perfect screen size for me.

Also if you work out $3000 divided by 52 weeks. It's $60 a week. If you are a professional web developer you would be able to invest an extra $60 easily.

@wsg Have a look at Apple's refurbished section, or maybe even a grey import on ebay to save you some cash. Also look at financing, it shall pay itself off it in no time.

lush, about 4 years ago

pineapple
posted by wsg on Mon, Oct 15 at 06:35AM

I think you guys have convinced me that I'm just going to have to bite the bullet and get myself a mac - I'd probably have to save up as I'm not hugely successful at the moment haha!

You really really should :)

pineapple, about 4 years ago

wsg
posted by lush on Mon, Oct 15 at 08:20AM
posted by pineapple on Sun, Oct 14 at 05:13PM
posted by lush on Sun, Oct 14 at 05:08PM
posted by pineapple on Sun, Oct 14 at 04:51PM

Hackintosh is probably another really great option. I only tried to do that once and I swore I would never do it again. Granted, it was on a shitty laptop and not a qualified pre-built box, but you could say I certainly learned about kexts, heh

Yeah you would need to use matching hardware, specifically for audio and wifi etc. Still, nothing beats a genuine Mac, also if you value your craft you should definitely invest.

Your last part I wholeheartedly agree with. $3k is a lot for a computer I suppose, but when you make that in a few days programming/designing websites it absolutely makes sense as an investment. I also couldn't live without my 27" cinema display, it is my baby. Just get one good gig for a small business and your computer is already paid off. Oh yes... also a year later the power converter in my monitor failed and apple fixes it for free in a few hours, their support is superb.

I've only upgraded my laptop once, but I know my old laptop is running strong because it sold it to someone I know. So technically, in the life of that ONE macbook pro, I know someone else who has gone through several shitty Acer and HP PC laptops. They just straight up die, overheat, explode, catch fire, whatever. My girlfriends mac laptop is so old that is literally warping from over-use, and it's also still going strong years and years later.

Yeah 27" iMac here, perfect screen size for me.

Also if you work out $3000 divided by 52 weeks. It's $60 a week. If you are a professional web developer you would be able to invest an extra $60 easily.

@wsg Have a look at Apple's refurbished section, or maybe even a grey import on ebay to save you some cash. Also look at financing, it shall pay itself off it in no time.

When you put it that way it sounds really cheap! haha! I think I've actually just landed a £4k (~$6.4k) job - I'll use that to get a macbook or something :)

wsg, about 4 years ago

pineapple
posted by wsg on Mon, Oct 15 at 10:57AM

When you put it that way it sounds really cheap! haha! I think I've actually just landed a £4k (~$6.4k) job - I'll use that to get a macbook or something :)

Not sure if you're accustom to using Mac at all, but on the off chance you aren't, I'll say this (if you already have used a Mac for some time then disregard)...

I think it would be the best investment you could make for serious development. I'm not discounting PC (I own one as well), and I'm sure there is some crazy way to set up windows so it's efficient, but in my experience if pales in comparison. I will be first to admit my entire time growing up I would hate on macs without even really trying one (lol those days).. I built and worked on PCs for over 10 years.

I was forced to use a VM about 3 years ago that had OSX on it (or maybe the one before it, don't remember). I was blown away at how it just seemed to be laid out in a more efficient way. Now, after having bought 2 macbook pros I cringe any time I need to do something over teamviewer for someone on their PC (for dev tasks too).

Just SIMPLE things that you're used to not having, are suddenly making your life easier - ALL passwords are stored in the keychain app (ftp, browser, apps, wifi), there's no registry and all files are structured into one folder (there are exceptions), it's built on linux obviously so all those command line tools you read about every day on this site will suddenly work. You won't have to use "dos".. seems like an abomination to me for a CLI, maybe theres some other shell out there for PC but I don't know if it. I could go on forever. Not to mention gvim is atrocious, and none of the popular plugins seem to work out of the box.

If you get one, let me know and I'll make a thread of all my favorite mac apps and tweaks. I have about 30 or 40 I couldn't live without, and use everyday.

pineapple, about 4 years ago

wsg
posted by pineapple on Mon, Oct 15 at 11:16AM
posted by wsg on Mon, Oct 15 at 10:57AM

When you put it that way it sounds really cheap! haha! I think I've actually just landed a £4k (~$6.4k) job - I'll use that to get a macbook or something :)

Not sure if you're accustom to using Mac at all, but on the off chance you aren't, I'll say this (if you already have used a Mac for some time then disregard)...

I think it would be the best investment you could make for serious development. I'm not discounting PC (I own one as well), and I'm sure there is some crazy way to set up windows so it's efficient, but in my experience if pales in comparison. I will be first to admit my entire time growing up I would hate on macs without even really trying one (lol those days).. I built and worked on PCs for over 10 years.

I was forced to use a VM about 3 years ago that had OSX on it (or maybe the one before it, don't remember). I was blown away at how it just seemed to be laid out in a more efficient way. Now, after having bought 2 macbook pros I cringe any time I need to do something over teamviewer for someone on their PC (for dev tasks too).

Just SIMPLE things that you're used to not having, are suddenly making your life easier - ALL passwords are stored in the keychain app (ftp, browser, apps, wifi), there's no registry and all files are structured into one folder (there are exceptions), it's built on linux obviously so all those command line tools you read about every day on this site will suddenly work. You won't have to use "dos".. seems like an abomination to me for a CLI, maybe theres some other shell out there for PC but I don't know if it. I could go on forever. Not to mention gvim is atrocious, and none of the popular plugins seem to work out of the box.

If you get one, let me know and I'll make a thread of all my favorite mac apps and tweaks. I have about 30 or 40 I couldn't live without, and use everyday.

I have to admit I've always been a mac hater, mostly based on their cost compared to PCs. I used an emac for a while in college and that thing RUINED my opinion of macs because it spent most of it's time crashing - but I do realize that it wasn't a proper mac and I can't base my feelings on those experiences. I've often been green with envy when I've seen the awesome apps available for macs that you just can't find on PC. As soon as I have the cash I'm 100% going to invest in one and do away with getting frustrated at windows all the time :D

wsg, about 4 years ago

pineapple
posted by wsg on Mon, Oct 15 at 11:56AM

I have to admit I've always been a mac hater, mostly based on their cost compared to PCs. I used an emac for a while in college and that thing RUINED my opinion of macs because it spent most of it's time crashing - but I do realize that it wasn't a proper mac and I can't base my feelings on those experiences. I've often been green with envy when I've seen the awesome apps available for macs that you just can't find on PC. As soon as I have the cash I'm 100% going to invest in one and do away with getting frustrated at windows all the time :D

Ah, Macs may not have been that great in their earlier days, but things have come a long, long way since then. Stability wise, I've had uptimes on my laptop of over 30 days with no slowdowns. I know people who have months of uptime on their mac pros that they just never shut off. and in the 2-3 years I've owned a mac I have had only 1 kernel panic (equivalent to BSOD, sorta).

pineapple, about 4 years ago

blueberry

I love the new retinas a lot, too

blueberry, about 4 years ago

kulehandluke

Just to chip in on the Mac front here's some options for a cheap route in:

  • You can always get a refurbished mac from apple which will have a discount and usually in perfect condition - search for refurbished mac on google.
  • If you don't mind 2nd hand check on gumtree/craigslist - you can pick up a bargain like 13" MacBook Pro's for <500 - I've got a mid-2009 one that works great. You can use whatever usb mouse/keyboard you like & use your current external monitor for when you are working at your desk.
  • I don't have experience doing this however I've seen plenty of posts with people doing this - you can even get a Mac Mini (again these are sometimes even cheaper 2nd hand) - plug in your monitor/keyboard etc and you're up & running.

EDIT: Oh and just to add, something people don't usually count on - the resell value - Macs tend to hold their value really well compared to windows pc's/laptops.

kulehandluke, about 4 years ago


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