Destroy All Software - Hardcore Screencasts Destroy All Software - Hardcore Screencasts / tutorial / paid

https://www.destroyallsoftware.com

An absolutely solid video series for intermediate to very advanced. They are dense and fast paced. Extremely effective use of vim and testing. Must see for anyone serious about development.
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submitted over 4 years ago, by travis
Destroy All Software - Hardcore Screencasts popular tutorial

15 Comments

pineapple

Just wanted to re-emphasize these. Probably one of my favorite screencasts series of all time in addition to Railscasts. Check out his one-minute demo as well as the full screencast demo at bottom of the page.

pineapple, almost 4 years ago

erlingur

Love these videos! I subscribed and promptly downloaded them all and watched around 80% in the first few days.

I really would like to learn VIM but Sublime Text really has my heart at the moment. VIM also feels like it takes a bit of work to set up just right.

Some day I'll master VIM... some day...

erlingur, almost 4 years ago

pineapple

DO IT! Can't recommend it enough :) You can use a starting .vimrc file to get you going, or email me and I'll send you my whole setup.

pineapple, almost 4 years ago

erlingur

I might just take you up on that! :)

erlingur, almost 4 years ago

pineapple

Enjoy ! Let me know if you have Q

pineapple, almost 4 years ago

SkinnyGeek1010

Yea I would recommend VIM as well.... i'm currently using Sublime with vintage mode and it has already boosted my productivity. It has a lot of VIM commands, but not all of them. Using vintage would be a good jumping off point though, you can at least get comfortable with different modes and basic navigating. I would also recommend the block cursor package if you use vintage.

I'm planning on switching to MacVim once I learn enough commands to hit a wall with vintage.

SkinnyGeek1010, almost 4 years ago

erlingur

Yeah, that's a good idea. I feel that the biggest problem for me with VIM is moving around. I'm really trying to get used to hjkl but it's really hard!

erlingur, almost 4 years ago

pineapple

It's really worth it. When I use a single mode editor over a VM or if I'm using a friend's computer it literally drives me mad. It seems like the most ass backwards thing, but only AFTER you start using something else. Then it's like.. why did I not start using this years ago? It's just a fundamental shift you have to make... which makes sense but is hard to grasp fully due to the learning curve.

Tiny anecdote: i've been helping my friend learn programming and I jokingly told him along with his new mac he has to use vim, and he doesn't have a choice. (I later told him if he doesn't like it after a month of REAL use, he can go back to sublime).

He's been learning it and even after 3 days I'd say he is much faster than his old PC with sublime. I think he really enjoys it, he seems to be a lot happier, perhaps he will chime in here.

I'd say its 1000% worth learning though, even though its a tough learning curve to start. It's really not 'that' bad though... even with the basics you can pick that up in a week.

Use vimtutor, and when you're done with that.. memorize some from the email I sent and once you're good on those email me again and I'll record you a quick screencast with all the keybindings specific to my config i sent you.

pineapple, almost 4 years ago

SkinnyGeek1010

Not to get too off topic, but could you email me your vimrc the next time you think of it... mine is really effed... I screwed something up with auto tabs and macvim never works right and also nearly explodes if I paste in someone else's code lol

SkinnyGeek1010, almost 4 years ago

SkinnyGeek1010

Hmm, I might have to subscribe to this sometime next week. I'm not writing a lot of ruby yet, but I want to start in a few weeks and try to port a node app over.... just to get the feel of Ruby.

Is it mainly rails focused?

Oh and his Vim skills make me want to hide in a dark corner and weep :)

SkinnyGeek1010, almost 4 years ago

pineapple

It has rails in it but I wouldn't say that's the only focus. His focus is on (retard-level speeds) of vim. I mean its actually kind of sickening how fast he is. He writes a lot of bash scripts that do all kinds of insane stuff with git, tons of focus on testing, refactoring etc. If you are even a bit interested in command line I would go for it. I mean it IS only $9 and you get access to all the videos.

Like my favorite episode he programs a terminal bash script which analyzes thousands of commits, uses all kinds of functions on them to give a probability graph of when a bug was introduced. I forget the specifics but it was insanely fascinating to watch.

pineapple, almost 4 years ago

SkinnyGeek1010

If you are even a bit interested in command line I would go for it.

I do love me some command line!

I mean it IS only $9 and you get access to all the videos.

Yep, good point. I can't see why a lot of people balk at paying money for good quality screencasts... I feel like I should pay Jeffrey Wey 10x more money for making jQuery, Backbone, and RegEx's really easy to learn =)

Like my favorite episode he programs a terminal bash script which analyzes thousands of commits, uses all kinds of functions on them to give a probability graph of when a bug was introduced.

ewwww nice! my interest is piqued!

SkinnyGeek1010, almost 4 years ago

pineapple

Let Me know what you think :)

pineapple, almost 4 years ago


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